Samuel Gentle
(1779-)
Sarah Setchell
(1785-)
William Gentle
(1826-1890)
Ann Bolton
(1824-1897)
Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle
(1850-1937)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Susannah Bailey

Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle

  • Born: 15 Jan 1850, Barton, Cambridgeshire England
  • Marriage (1): Susannah Bailey on 15 Apr 1874 in York, Western Australia
  • Died: 6 Sep 1937, Vine Cottage, Quellington, Western Australia at age 87

  General Notes:

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for the addition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raised concerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[alex_new.GED]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for the addition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raised concerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[JENNIEnew1.FTW]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for the addition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raised concerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[alex_new.GED]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for the addition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raised concerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[Phoenix family tree.ged]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for theaddition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raisedconcerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[alex_new.GED]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for the addition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raised concerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the York School, where the children were transported by bus. The local school bus driver Mr. E Davey used the School building as living quarters on a rental basis until December 1952. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gentle, son of Samuel also lived there while their new house was being built. As Mr. Mark Gentle already owned the land on which the schoolhouse stood, he applied to the Department to buy the building. His application was granted and he purchased it in 1954 for the sum of 175 pounds. The Government Gazette dated 31 July 1959 cancelled the Reserve classification from School to Private Dwelling.[JENNIEnew1.FTW]

Quellington School House
The first schoolhouse at Quellington was built by Samuel Setchell Frederick Gentle for the education of his children, five in number at the time. It was built of mud and straw bricks with bush timber supports, a thatched roof of blackboy rushes, whitewashed walls and beaten mud floor -- identical to the original home and a few yards away from it. After a short while the other settlers in the district asked Samuel Gentle if their children could join the Gentle School to which it was commonly referred. This was agreed to for the payment of one shilling per week, paid toward the teacher's salary. The earliest letter in the Archives relating to Quellington School dated 17 December 1884 is from the York District board applying for the status of Provincial School, the teacher being Mr. J F Connor. This application was granted subject to the Inspector of Schools finding Mr. Connor to be a competent teacher. Eighteen children were enrolled but on 5 November 1885, the school closed. It was reopened on 21 February 1889 and Mr. George Pearson appointed teacher, subject to being able to pass the necessary examinations set by the Board of Education in Perth. On 23 April 1891 Mr. Hy Scott was appointed teacher but on 5 October of the same year he complained of poor attendance and suggested closing the school down at Christmas time. On 6 January 1892 a petition was sent to Perth together with a roll book showing that attendance had improved and the District Board agreed to let the school continue. The building of a new schoolhouse of brick and mortar was commenced on 10 September 1895 on 1 1/2 acres of land donated by Mr. Samuel S F Gentle. The contractors for the new building were Thorn, Bower and Stewart. It appears that from this time the school ran smoothly for some years. On 24 October 1899 some fencing was done around the schoolhouse to keep out livestock. Miss Hannah Gleeson was head mistress at the time receiving a salary of 90 pounds per annum. In 1905 the then teacher, Miss Myra K Smith applied for theaddition of an extra room. This was erected for the cost of 155 pounds on 12 January 1906. New water tanks, removed from Tipperary school, were added in 1908 and the old tank used as a fowl house. Little is known of Quellington School prevented attendance at the school to such a degree that closure was threatened. Closure did in fact occur on 22 January 1920 following a letter from the Inspector of Schools noting the lack of regular attendance of pupils. In Parliament at the time, questions were raisedconcerning the situation of country schools. A representation from Mr. H Griffiths M.L.A gave the parents of Quellington district three alternatives for the education of their children:
1. Drive to York School, receiving a grant from the Education Department.
2. Parents could employ a teacher themselves and receive a 10-pound grant per child.
3. The children could join the correspondence classes that already catered for about 250 children.
The school remained open and Mr. C T Britts, a returned soldier was appointed to take charge of Quellington and Malebelling schools on a half time bases. Quellington however, was once again closed on 18 May 1920. Letters followed between the Education Board and some concerned parents who were seeking to have the school reopened. Mr. Senior Inspector McClintock visited Quellington in early 1929 to ascertain the possibility of reopening the school. On 1 September 1930 the school reopened its doors with Miss Hazel Pollard as teachers in residence. In 1940 the attendance fluctuated again and in 1943-44 there were only 6 children enrolled. The school was permanently closed on 27 October 1944 and the furniture stored at the Yo[goss1.FTW]

Quellington Sch

  Noted events in his life were:

Immigration: Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia; per Strathmore, 12 Jun 1864.

Occupation: farmer.

Baptism: Barton, Cambridgeshire, England, 17 Mar 1850.


Samuel married Susannah Bailey on 15 Apr 1874 in York, Western Australia. (Susannah Bailey was born in 1856 in York, Western Australia and died on 19 Aug 1934 in Quellington, near York, Western Australia.)


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