John Dixon
(Cir 1780-)
Hannah Stanley
(1788-1854)

Charlotte Stanley
(1810-1853)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Richard Coleborne Edsall

2. George Erby

Charlotte Stanley

  • Born: 20 Dec 1810, Sydney, NSW Australia 199
  • Marriage (1): Richard Coleborne Edsall in 1825 in St Matthews C of E, Windsor, Sydney, NSW Australia
  • Marriage (2): George Erby on 10 Jul 1833 in All Saints C of E, Sutton Forest, NSW Australia 199
  • Died: 10 Mar 1853, Darby Murrays' Flat, Goulburn, NSW Australia at age 42

  Research Notes:

Brian Kelly notes:
Charlotte was accidently killed on 10 March 1853 at Derby, Murray Flats (near Goulburn), NSW, aged 42 years, preceding her mother by nearly two years

  Noted events in her life were:

• Newspaper Story. Brian Kelly notes:
Charlotte Stanley and Richard Coleborne Edsall Newspaper Transcripts

Hampshire Chronicle 7 January 1811:

WINCHESTER, SATURDAY, JAN. 5. We mentioned in our last Paper, that a most daring robbery had been committed at the Bank of Messrs, Waller and Ballard, in this city, from which notes, &c. to the amount of more than 1000l. had been stolen. Notwithstanding the most vigilant inquiry, nothing transpired to discover the persons concerned in this robbery till very late on Saturday night. On that night, however, the offenders were discovered to be Richard Edsall and Samuel Bennett, both living in this city. The following are the circumstances which led to their apprehension :\endash The prisoners went, on that evening, to the house of Mr. Michael Chalker, in the High-street, and Bennett, who knew Mrs. Chalker, enquired of her if she had any lodgings, as he wanted a room for a young man who had lately been discharged as a clerk from the Barracks, and was going to write for an attorney in Winchester ; after some conversation between Bennett and Mrs. Chalker (Edsall not taking any part in it), Bennett wished to see the room. Edsall went away for a few minutes, and Bennett, who bought with him a large box, which he put down at the street door, observing, that he could not leave the box at the door, Mrs. Chalker's servant was desired to watch it, while he, Bennett, went to see the room, which was at the back of the house, and having a communication with another street. Bennett, on seeing the apartment, expressed himself extremely satisfied with it, and enquired what the expence would be. Mrs. Chalker said, "she should not charge much for it, as she should not be able to do anything for the young gentleman except making his bed, and that she would take four shillings per week." Bennett said, "that is not enough, you ought to charge as much again ; I will say five shillings, and which I say will be right. Bennet then came down stairs to another part of the house, where he met Edsall. Mrs. Chalker hearing his name, recollected and well knew him ; but did not until that time know for who the lodgings were intended. The prisoners afterwards went a few yards from the house, but not out of sight of the box, and after a few minutes conversation returned, bringing with them the box into the house, which they took into the bed-room, Bennett observing to Edsall, "this is just the thing for you, you can come in and out when you like." They then left the house, but Bennett in a minute or two returned and said to Mrs. Chalker, "I want something out of the box ;" Mrs. Chalker lighted him to the room, and he opened the box, which had no lock on it, and took out something which rattled like money. On some observation being made by Mrs. Chalker respecting it, Bennett said, "it was only halfpence." After he was gone, Mrs. Chalker having a suspicion (to use her words) that all was not right, determined to examine the box, in which she found a variety of articles, viz. pens, quills, sealing-wax, and paper ; also a pair of wet sheets and towels, from the marks of which she suspected they were the property of Sir Richard Gamon, Bart, whose premises had lately been robbed of linen; and she immediately went to Sir Richards house and informed the housekeeper of it, who returned with her and identified the towel and one of the sheets to be Sir Richards, and the other sheet her own. Mr. Chalker soon afterwards coming home, Mrs. C. related these circumstances to him, and they agreed in opinion, that this was the person who had robbed the Bank. Mr. Chalker went immediately to Mr. Waller's house ; in the meantime Edsall came in, and Mrs. Chalker, in order to keep him up until her husband returned, invited him to sit down in the parlour, telling him his bed was not ready. Mr. C. soon came in, and brought with him Mr. Page, the Keeper of the County Bridewell, and Mr. Lavender, a Bow-street Officer, who had been brought down on the first discovery of the robbery. They took the prisoner into the bed-room, who owned the box and all the articles in, and upon their searching him they found bank notes, country notes, drafts, and cash, to the amount of nine hundred and sixty-five pounds and sixpence ; several of which bills and notes Mr. Waller has sworn were locked up in a drawer, in the Bank, by him on the evening of the robbery. The prisoners were examined on Monday before the Mayor and Magistrates of the city, and the preceding facts being clearly proved, they were both committed for trial at the ensuring Assizes, the prisoners urged nothing in their defence. Edsall seemed extremely ill, and fainted during the examination. It appeared that he had refused to take any kind of food from the time he had been taken. It appeared the prisoners were not content with the notes and cash they found in the Bank, but they also took writing paper, pens, sealing wax, and other trilling articles. The discovery of these articles in the prisoner's box, created the suspicion of his having committed the robbery.

Oxford University and City Herald 12 January 1811:

Richard Edsall and Samuel Bennett were committed to Winchester Gaol, charged with having broken open the banking-house (being part of the dwelling-house) of Mr. Nicholas Waller, and stolen thereout Bank of England notes, country notes, and bankers' drafts, to the amount of upwards of 1030l. The circumstances that led to the discovery of the parties, was Bennett carrying Edsall's box from his former lodging, to another he had taken in the town, and desiring the persons of the house to take care of it, as it contained property to a great amount, which raised their curiosity, and having unlocked the box, they found in it some stolen linen, and on further search discovered the property of Mr. Waller, to the amount of 965l. 9s. 6d., the remainder being squandered in the purchase of a watch, boots, &c. Edsall, is also detained on a charge of stealing a sheet, the property of Sir R. Gammon.

Hampshire Chronicle 11 March 1811:

WINCHESTER SATURDAY MARCH 9. HANTS LENT ASSIZES.

The assizes for this county began on Monday last, at the Castle of this city, and ended Friday morning. The following five capital convicts received sentence of death:\endash …………. Richard Edsall, for burglariously breaking open the banking-house of Messrs. Waller and Ballard, in Winchester, and stealing therefrom cash and Bank of England notes, &c. to the amount of one thousand and thirty pounds. The bank was entered by removing the bricks under the window. [See the account of his examination inserted in our paper of the 7th of January.] Samual Bennett, who was examined with Edsall, as an accomplice in the robbery, was acquitted.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal 11 March 1811:

WINCHESTER SATURDAY, MARCH 9.

On Monday last the Hon. Sir Alan Chambre and Hon. Sir John Bayley, Knts. Arrived in this city, and opened the Commission for holding the Assizes for the County of Hants. There were thirty-two prisoners on the calender, five of whom were capitally convicted and received sentence of death, viz.\endash……; Richard Edsall, for burglariously entering the banking-house of Messrs. Waller and Co. of this city, and stealing property to a very considerable amount ; ……\endash They were all reprieved. …… The following were the most interesting trials at the Crown Bar:\endash Richard Edsall and Samuel Bennett, for breaking into the banking-house (being part of the dwellinghouse) of Mr. N. Waller, of this city,\endash The prosecutor stated, that at ten o'clock on the night of the 26th of December he left his banking-house, at which time everything was secure ; he left a variety of notes in the room, among them was a hundred pound note of the Bank of England, which he had that day received from the Rev. Mr. Chapman ; he also received a 10l. note of the Thornborough Bank, another of the Wallingford Bank, and another of the Glamorganshire Bank, which he had that day received from Mr. James Coates, and on which he had written Mr. Coates's name\endash those notes he could identify. Between seven and eight o'clock on the following morning he was called, and informed his banking-room had been broken into ; on entering it he discovered a hole in the wall, under the window, and on searching the premises he missed property to the amount of 1000l. Stephen Lavender, a Bow-street officer, stated, that on the night of the 29th of December he went to Mr. Chalker's house, and apprehended the prisoner Edsall, in a back parlour, and enquired of him if the box upstairs belonged to him? He answered, it did ;\endash in it was found a large amount in notes and cash, among which was a Bank bill for 100l. which he left in the hands of the Mayor, who lodged it, with the other property, for safety, in a banking-house in London, having first indorsed it, and sealed the paper with his seals. When the prisoner (Edsall) was apprehended, he was asked how he came by the property, and whether he found it? The prisoner said "he was not so lucky." Bennett was taken into custody the same evening.\endash William Druitt, Esq. the mayor, said he received the 100l. note from the last witness, and retained it in his own possession till he produced it in court. The Rev. George Chapman said he paid a Bank of England note into the banking-house of Messrs, Wallers, for one hundred pounds, on the day of the robbery, which he identified from the date and number. Mr. Robert Ballard, a partner in the bank, went with the officers to the house of Mr. Chalker when Edsall was apprehended ; on him was found a seal, which Mr. B. identified, as belonging to the banking-house. Mr James Coates proved that the note marked with his name was the same which he paid into the hands of Messrs, Waller, and which Mr. Waller indorsed in his presence. John Edmonds, a labourer, said he was going to work between six and seven o'clock in the morning on the 27th of December, and passing by Mr. Waller's he observed a hole in the wall, on which he alarmed the family. The prisoners made no defence\endash Bennett was acquitted,\endash Edsall was found Guilty, and received sentence of Death ; but on the petition of the prosecutor, was reprieved before the Judges left the city.
Globe 15 March 1811:

WINCHESTER ASSIZES, MARCH 9. (Continued)

The following were the most interesting trials at the Crown Bar:\endash Richard Edsall and Samuel Bennett, for breaking into the banking-house (being part of the dwellinghouse) of Mr. N. Waller, of this city. The Prosecutor stated, that at ten o'clock on the night of the 26th of December he left his banking-house, at which time everything was secure ; he left a variety of notes in the room, among them was a hundred pound note of the Bank of England, which he had that day received from the Rev. Mr. Chapman ; he also received a 10l. note of the Thornborough Bank, another of the Wallingford Bank, and another of the Glamorganshire Bank, which he had that day received from Mr. James Coates, and on which he had written Mr. Coates's name\endash those notes he could identify. Between seven and eight o'clock on the following morning he was called, and informed his banking-room had been broken into ; on entering it he discovered a hole in the wall, under the window, and on searching the premises he missed property to the amount of 1000l. Stephen Lavender, a Bow-street Officer, stated, that on the night of the 29th of December he went to Mr. Chalker's house, and apprehended the prisoner Edsall, in a back parlour, and enquired of him if the box upstairs belonged to him? He answered, it did ;\endash in it was found a large amount in notes and cash, among which was a Bank bill for 100l. which he left in the hands of the Mayor, who lodged it, with the other property, for safety, in a banking-house in London, having first endorsed it, and sealed the paper with his seals. When the prisoner (Edsall) was apprehended, he was asked how he came by the property, and whether he found it? The prisoner said "he was not so lucky." Bennett was taken into custody the same evening. William Druitt, Esq. the mayor, said he received the 100l. note from the last witness, and retained it in his own possession till he produced it in court. The Rev. George Chapman said he paid a Bank of England note into the banking-house of Messrs, Wallers, for 100l., on the day of the robbery, which he identified from the date and number. Mr. Robert Ballard, a partner in the bank, went with the officer to the house of Mr. Chalker when Edsall was apprehended ; on him was found a seal, which Mr. B. identified, as belonging to the banking-house. Mr James Coates proved that the note marked with his name was the same which he paid into the hands of Messrs, Waller, and which Mr. Waller endorsed in his presence. John Edmonds, a labourer, said he was going to work between six and seven o'clock in the morning on the 27th of December, and passing by Mr. Waller's he observed a hole in the wall, on which he alarmed the family. The Prisoners made no defence. Bennett was acquitted ; Edsall was found Guilty, and received sentence of death ; but on the petition of the prosecutor, was reprieved before the Judges left the city.
The Monitor Friday 8 December 1826:

WINDSOR, Nov. 20, \emdash RICHARD EDSALL complained, that his wife had assaulted him with a knife, and he exposed several cuts which had been inflicted about his head. He had been admitted a patient in the hospital, and not before this been able to give evidence in Court. He complained that he had occasion to cry down the credit of his wife, and stated that he had employed a man with a bell to do so ; he conceived it further necessary to take into his possession a stick for uses of the home government, (Oh admirable Judge Bullet!) which he had done on law authorities, but his wife had possesed herself of the leg of a chair, wherewith to defend herself from the instrument first described, which had been displayed in a lordly manner during the afternoon. A cessation of war, however, took place by the timely intercession of one whose good will was unqualified towards either, which fact no one disputed, and the stick and chair leg were both laid aside however new animosities sprung up during the night, the consequence of which will be tried and decided at another time and place. It was confidently anticipated that a certain handsome lawyer will be retained on this trial. Committed for trial.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Monday 29 January 1827:

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20. \emdash The Court opened its proceedings with a trial of assault and battery, wherein Richard Edsall and wife displayed a scene of misery too frequent where a disparity of years brings about the discomforts of human life. She was the complainant; her "detail" is so generally known, 'tis needless to comment ; suffice it to say, Richard was found guilty, and ordered to find bail to appear at the sessions.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Saturday 10 March 1827

WINDSOR.

FEB. 23.- Richard Edsall charged Edward Butler, a particular old friend and acquaintance, with assault, and what not. It is a pity, the public will say, that two such truly intimate companions should quarrel about this, that, or the other, although the defendant has no legal claim against Edsall's peace. Butler ordered to find sureties not to disturb plaintiff's peace for 12 months.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Friday 16 November 1827

WINDSOR. Tuesday, 23d October, 1827.

The King v. Richard Edsall. \endash Defendant had been duly summoned to attend the Court of General Sessions, to answer for a breach of the peace, whereupon he said to the constable who served him - "I am now in His Majesty's Store, but as soon as I can make it convenient I will attend;" conceiving, as it would seem, that he was of great store to His Majesty, even beyond a Court of Record did be appreciate his own consequence.This indignity caused a warrant to be issued for the contempt; nevertheless he was still under His Majesty's control, altho' stored in a different way: - he, however, humbled himself, sent a mediator with a letter, and expressed contrition to the Bench. - Reprimanded, and discharged, without costs.
The Sydney Morning Herald Wednesday 14 October 1846

LAW INTELLIGENCE. CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT. TUESDAY, BEFORE HIS HONOR THE CHIEF JUSTICE WOUNDING WITH INTENT TO MAIM

Richard Edsall was indicted for having, at Sydney, on the 2nd August last, stabbed one James Thompson, on the forehead, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm. The prisoner and the prosecutor were both old men, and resided together in Pitt-street with an old woman named Evans. There was a good deal of quarrelling between the two in consequence of Thompson having accused the prisoner and the old woman of stealing some wood which he had purchased; but on the evening in question they had all been drinking together, and both the parties were the worse for liquor. According to the evidence of the prosecutor, Edsall sharpened a knife, while he, the prosecutor, was lying in bed, and threatened to "let out his bowels." Thompson sprang up and a scuffle ensued, in the course of which the prisoner got hold of a tomahawk, and struck Thompson on the head with it; he also stabbed Thompson in the face with the knife. The prosecutor still bore upon his right temple the marks of a severe injury. A man named Smith, who resided near the spot, deposed to having seen the prisoner strike the prosecutor on the head with an axe handle; and the wife of this witness gave evidence as to the prisoner having given the old woman a tomahawk to burn, saying that he expected to be taken to the watchhouse, and some of the old fellow's blood was upon the weapon. On reference, however, to the depositions of these witnesses, it was found that they had given very different evidence at the Police Office, having sworn on that occasion that they saw a tomahawk used. They adhered, however, to their present story, and asserted that they had no recollection of having given such evidence as was mentioned in the deposition. The prisoner, in defence, appealed to his previous good character, having been thirty years in the colony, and never been before a Court on a similar charge. He asserted that the prosecutor was so much in liquor at the time, that he could give no account of the matter that was entitled to credit, and concluded by solemnly asserting his innocence. His Honor, in putting the case to the Jury, left it to them to say whether they believed the prisoner or not, and remarked, that from the variation between the evidence given in Court and that at the Police Office, he had no doubt but that perjury had been committed, and would leave the proper authorities to deal with the subject as they might deem proper. The Jury, without leaving the box, found a verdict of guilty, on which his Honor remanded the prisoner for sentence ; after having informed him that he certainly would be transported; but that the amount of punishment which would be awarded would depend on the information he might receive as to his character from the police, whom he directed to enquire for, and to lay before him before Saturday - whatever information they were possessed of respecting the prisoner, the prosecutor, and the witnesses
The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 20 October 1846

WOUNDING WITH INTENT.

Richard Edsall, indicted for wounding, with intent to do some grievous bodily harm, and found guilty, was sentenced to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for three years.

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser Saturday 5 June 1852:

Sydney News. [From our Correspondent.] Sydney, Wednesday Evening

George Phillips, Israel Chapman, and Richard Edsall were this day committed to take their trial on a charge of stealing £7 15s., on Saturday last, from Richard Willock, residing in Kent-street.

The Goulburn Herald and County of Argyle Advertiser Saturday 12 March 1853:

DREADFUL ACCIDENT. \emdash On the evening of Thursday last, as a woman named Charlotte Erby was returning from Goulburn to her home at Darby Murray's, and when about two miles from town, near Stewart's ferry, the cart in which she and her child about five years old, were sitting, passed over a log, capsized, and buried both mother and child beneath it. George Erby her husband, uneasy at her continued absence, started from home on foot to meet her ; when near the spot where the accident occurred, he heard an indistinct struggling, but from the darkness of the night could not see what it was. He proceeded on to Goulburn, and there ascertained that his wife had left about two o'clock in the afternoon. He instantly retraced his steps, and when near the spot where he heard the noise, he called his child by name, she replied, he then went to the spot where he found the cart overturned, the horse lying on his back, the child on the ground with its thigh underneath the cart. Of his wife he could see nothing except her legs and feet, the remaining portion of her body being buried completely underneath the cart. She was quite dead. he then proceeded home and obtained the assistance of his brother and another man, by their united exertions the deceased and child were conveyed home. The child afterwards told her father that when the cart upset, her mother never spoke a word. This woman was well known in town for many years as a vendor of fruit and vegetables. An inquest was held yesterday on the body before R. Waugh, Esq., coroner for the district. It was the opinion of J. Gerard, Esq., the medical gentleman who examined the deceased, that the immediate cause of death was suffocation ; there was also a slight abrasion of the skin on the left cheek. The fore and upper parts of the chest were much swollen and discolored : the vessels of these parts being much congested, blood had also issued from the nose. The jury, according to the direction of the coroner, returned a verdict of " Died from the effects of injuries accidentally received."
Colonial Times Thursday 7 April 1853:

DREADFUL ACCIDENT. \emdash On the evening of Thursday last, as a woman named Charlotte Erby was returning from Goulburn to her home at Darby Murray's, and when about two miles from town, near Stewart's ferry, the cart in which she and her child about five years old, were sitting, passed over a log, capsized, and buried both mother and child beneath it. George Erby her husband, uneasy at her continued absence, started from home on foot to meet her ; when near the spot where the accident occurred, he heard an indistinct struggling, but from the darkness of the night could not see what it was. He proceeded on to Goulburn, and there ascertained that his wife had left about two o'clock in the afternoon. He instantly retraced his steps, and when near the spot where he heard the noise, he called his child by name, she replied, he then went to the spot where he found the cart overturned, the horse lying on his back, the child on the ground with its thigh underneath the cart. Of his wife he could see nothing except her legs and feet, the remaining portion of her body being buried completely underneath the cart. She was quite dead. he then proceeded home and obtained the assistance of his brother and another man, by their united exertions the deceased and child were conveyed home. The child afterwards told her father that when the cart upset, her mother never spoke a word. This woman was well known in town for many years as a vendor of fruit and vegetables. An inquest was held yesterday on the body before R. Waugh, Esq., coroner for the district. It was the opinion of J. Gerard, Esq., the medical gentleman who examined the deceased, that the immediate cause of death was suffocation ; there was also a slight abrasion of the skin on the left cheek. The fore and upper parts of the chest were much swollen and discolored : the vessels of these parts being much congested, blood had also issued from the nose. The jury, according to the direction of the coroner, returned a verdict of " Died from the effects of injuries accidentally received." Goulburn Herald, March 12.


Charlotte married Richard Coleborne Edsall in 1825 in St Matthews C of E, Windsor, Sydney, NSW Australia. (Richard Coleborne Edsall was born in 1780 in Fordingbridge, Hampshire England and died in 1853 199.)


Charlotte next married George Erby on 10 Jul 1833 in All Saints C of E, Sutton Forest, NSW Australia.199 (George Erby was born in 1794 in Oxfordshire England and died on 21 Apr 1862 199.)


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